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Vicky's 2nd Hip
Dr. Mont Interview, Baltimore, MD PDF Print E-mail

Interviewed by Vicky Marlow on September 1, 2008

1.) How did you get started with Hip Resurfacing and tell us about your background and experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?
I began doing hemi-resurfacing for a disease called avascular necrosis or osteonecrosis and sometimes called AVN for short. As some of you may know, this is a disease that involves only the femoral head and is often associated with alcohol abuse or corticosteroid use. Some of you may know that Bo Jackson’s hip problems after getting a dislocation may have led to avascular necrosis which was in the news. So, a traumatic insult such as a fracture or dislocation can also lead to the disease. It’s notable that this affects a lot of young people and eventually leads to arthritis. At one point we were doing hemi-resurfacing which is only the femoral head part of the resurfacing procedure and I originally started doing these because two of my mentors, Dr. David Hungerford and Dr. Kenneth Krackow, had taught me this procedure. Some of the earlier devices we used, for example, did not even have stems. They simply capped the femoral head and I still believe today that the stemmed part of the device is not that important for stability, it is more for teaching and for alignment issues when you first begin performing these procedures.

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Dr. Marwin Interview, NY PDF Print E-mail

Interviewed by Vicky Marlow November 3, 2008

1.) Hi Dr. Marwin, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

  • I got interested in HR several years back during a time period when both minimally invasive surgery and hip resurfacing came into the orthopaedic consciousness. Bone preservation seemed very intriguing to me because in reality it meant preservation of normal anatomic and kinamatic relationships. Small incision surgery was just that – surgery through a smaller hole.  Did this mean preservation of the soft tissue envelope or as the pundits say, “preservation of ligaments, tendons, and muscle”. With the stretch on the soft tissues, I didn’t really believe it.
  • I trained in Birmingham with Mr. McMinn.
  • After I was trained, I did some cadaveric work before I operated on a human.
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Dr. Macaulay Interview, NY PDF Print E-mail

Interviewed by Vicky Marlow on May 8, 2008

1.) Hi Dr. Macaulay, Welcome to the interview. Can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon? Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you observe after the initial training and/or do cadaver labs prior to your first patient?
I have been performing versions of hip resurfacing for more than 5 years now. I fell in love with the concept of total hip resurfacing while on the British Traveling Fellowship (BTF, sponsored by the US Hip Society which every two years sends two of the most promising young hip surgeons in the US to the UK), a four week tour of 9 or 10 UK sites with a reputation for superior hip surgery. I was quite surprised to see hip resurfacing being performed at 5 of those sites. These patients were amongst the most enthusiastic about their surgery and theirs surgeons) that I had ever come across. I came back to the US and started paying more attention to presentations at national meetings reading more about.

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Dr. Kelly Interview, Colorado PDF Print E-mail

Interviewed by Vicky Marlow February 7, 2008

What approach do you choose to use the posterior approach or anterior and why?
I use the posterior approach to the hip for resurfacing arthroplasty for a couple of reasons. It is felt to be a 'muscle sparing' operation which in younger and more active patients is advantageous. The other reason is that it is the approach with which I am most familiar. It gives me the ability to place the components in their appropriate location/alignment with the best visualization. I believe that either approach is acceptable and that a surgeon should use the approach that is most familiar/comfortable for them to implant the prostheses appropriately.

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Dr. Gross Interview, S. Carolina PDF Print E-mail

Interviewed by Vicky Marlow January 17, 2008

1.) Hi Dr. Gross, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

I went to medical school and trained in orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital, in Baltimore, MD. I took a Joint Replacement Fellowship for one additional year with Dr. William Bargar, one of the world’s foremost experts in custom joint replacement implants, in Sacramento CA. I have been in the private practice of Orthopedics at Midlands Orthopaedics as a joint replacement specialist in Columbia, SC for the last 15 years.

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