Doctors Interviews

  • Dr. Pritchett, Seattle, WA

    Hi Dr. Pritchett, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

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  • Dr. Brooks, Cleveland, OH

    Hi Dr. Brooks, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon.

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  • Dr. Malhan Interview, Mumbai, India

    Having completed my orthopaedic residency programme in the KEM Hospital, Mumbai (India), I joined the same institute as a junior consultant and lecturer. KEM Hospital is a 1800 bedded tertiary level university hospital. I had an interest in joint reconstruction surgery and was especially attracted to tissue conserving techniques.

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  • Dr. Jinnah Interview, North Carolina

    Hi Dr. Jinnah, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

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  • Dr. Marwin Interview, NY

    Hi Dr. Marwin, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

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  • Dr. Ball Interview, San Diego, CA

    I trained with Dr. Amstutz and Dr. Schmalzried in Los Angeles for one year with a specific focus on hip resurfacing. During that time, I scrubbed on about 250+ resurfacing cases. Since returning to San Diego where I practice now, I have done about 100 resurfacing cases.

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  • Dr. Mont Interview, Baltimore, MD

    I began doing hemi-resurfacing for a disease called avascular necrosis or osteonecrosis and sometimes called AVN for short. As some of you may know, this is a disease that involves only the femoral head and is often associated with alcohol abuse or corticosteroid use. Some of you may know that Bo Jackson’s hip problems after getting a dislocation may have led to avascular necrosis which was in the news.

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  • Dr. Macaulay Interview, NY

    Hi Dr. Macaulay, Welcome to the interview. Can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon? Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you observe after the initial training and/or do cadaver labs prior to your first patient?

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  • Dr. Huddleston Interview, L.A., CA

    Hi Dr. Huddleston, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

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  • Dr. Clarke Interview, Syracuse, NY

    I use the posterior approach because it provides the best exposure for me and because it has been associated with excellent results for hip resurfacing. I have, however, used other approaches in the past including the antero-lateral approach and a less invasive medial approach through an incision hidden in the groin.

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  • Dr. Rubinstein Interview, Chicago, IL

    Hi Dr. Rubinstein, can you please first start out by telling us how you got started with Hip Resurfacing and give us a little background on your experience as a surgeon. Where did you train for hip resurfacing? Who trained you? Did you continue your training after starting resurfacing?

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  • Dr. Kelly Interview, Colorado

    I use the posterior approach to the hip for resurfacing arthroplasty for a couple of reasons. It is felt to be a 'muscle sparing' operation which in younger and more active patients is advantageous. The other reason is that it is the approach with which I am most familiar. It gives me the ability to place the components in their appropriate location/alignment with the best visualization. I believe that either approach is acceptable and that a surgeon should use the approach that is most familiar/comfortable for them to implant the prostheses appropriately.

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